Friday, January 12, 2018

January-Transitions

January- Transitions


Transitions in preschool can be very challenging and stressful for both the child and adult. It is important to remember to keep transitions to a minimum and also to provide children with clear expectations. One of the best ways to help make transitions smooth is by providing children with a warning. They are often times engaged in an activity and stopping to move on to a new activity can be disruptive. So providing a warning that this is going to happen will hopefully help minimize behaviors. For example, “In five minutes we are going to stop and clean up for circle time.” This allows children time to finish what they are working on and prepare for what is coming next. It is important to make sure you stick to the time frame and directions given.
Another way to help young children transition is to make it fun. One way to do this might be to play a clean up song or sing a song. Other ways to make transitions fun might include using different movements. For example, maybe your child is avoiding going to bed. After they brush their teeth try having them hop or crawl to bed pretending to be an animal. You might also try using counting. For example, you want your child to stop playing and come to the table for dinner. You would provide them with a warning and then when time is up you ask them to count how many steps they have to take to get to the dinner table.
Transitions occur throughout the day so keeping these strategies in mind will help make things smoother for the child and adult. For more creative ideas how to make transitions fun check out Pinterest!

Friday, January 5, 2018

December-Aggression

The Child Mind Institute breaks down the many causes of aggression in children. Some of the causes include mood disorders, psychosis, frustration, impulsivity, conduct disorder, injury, and trauma. It is important to understand where a child’s aggression is coming from before you can treat it. The most common type of aggression found in children ages 4 and 7 is hostile aggression. Hostile aggression can be shown as overt aggression, which entails physical harm or as relational aggression, which entails damaging peer relationships or spreading rumors. Some children will move beyond aggressive behavior and learn how to handle conflict. For those children that continue to use physical aggression there are some steps that caregivers can take to teach young children that violence and aggression are unacceptable.
Caregivers should not model violent or aggressive behavior in front of young children. This includes responding to a child engaging in aggressive behavior. It is important to stay calm and talk to the young children about the inappropriate behavior. This conversation should take place in a calm voice, as soon as the child is calm, and be short and direct about expectations of appropriate behavior.







Parents who find themselves in a violent, dangerous, or abusive relationship can call 1-800-799-SAFE (7233) to reach The National Domestic Violence Hotline, for crisis help, safety planning, or referrals to local resources.