Friday, March 3, 2017

March-Sleep and Bedtime Routine

SLEEP AND BEDTIME ROUTINE
A good night’s sleep is necessary for a child’s well-being, adults too! Not getting enough zzz’s can affect behavior, ability to attend, and mood. Getting your child to sleep is not always an easy task. The resources below will inform you about the benefits of a good rest and also list some ideas on how to get one!




DID YOU KNOW? Children tend to fall asleep faster and sleep longer when they go to bed before 9 p.m.

FUN FACT: lack of sleep affects behavior. In addition, keeping all electronics out of the bedroom will help children to get a good night’s sleep.

Friday, February 3, 2017

February- Stress Management

Stress Management
Stress is a normal reaction to challenges and changes and an inevitable part of all of our lives – even our kids! Some stress can be a good thing, but overwhelming stress can be damaging to your health and have negative effects on parenting skills. It’s good to have some tricks up your sleeve for trying times!









FUN FACT: Parents who are more sensitive to their infants’ needs and respond quickly to emotional cues tend to raise children who are better at regulating their own emotions. Successfully managing your own stress is vital to being responsive to your children!

DID YOU KNOW? There are free programs available for parents that provide counseling, resource linkage and hands on training to help ensure healthy children and healthy families. For more information, contact Jen Wallis, Family Support Facilitator at 282-5184 x 2406

Friday, January 6, 2017

January-Social Skills Development

Socially and emotionally competent children are skilled at managing their emotions and behavior, cooperating with others, forming positive relationships, and making responsible…decisions. (Collaborative for Academic, Social, and Emotional Learning, 2007) Current research in early childhood education supports that children need to be taught social skills and appropriate behavior, just like they are taught letters and numbers. Click on the links below to know what to expect as your child grows and how to help them grow socially and emotionally.




FUN FACT: Social interaction increases the speed and accuracy of learning in all ages, including babies.

DID YOU KNOW? At Don Earl, we implement a curriculum called Second Step to help students learn appropriate social skills. Second Step is a learning program designed to increase school readiness and social success by building social-emotional competence and self-regulation skills. Lessons are completed in the general classroom and sometimes in smaller groups with our family facilitator as part of our Positive Behavior Support program. For more details, contact your child’s teacher.

Friday, December 2, 2016

December: Attention

ATTENTION

“Attention” in school is often mentioned when referring to how long your child can participate in a group or activity, as in “attention span.”  In this post, we are focused on attention seeking behavior, which is a common cause of unwanted behaviors in preschoolers. All children need attention and some need it more than others! If children do not receive sufficient positive attention through playing and interacting with others, they will often seek out it out in other ways. This can result in unwanted behavior. It may sound crazy to us, but for a child, negative attention is better than no attention at all! Here are some resources that should help explain attention seeking behaviors along with some strategies to help deal with it.

DID YOU KNOW? At the Don Earl Center, we use the Guiding Hand as a method to help teach appropriate expectations and promote positive interactions. Please contact your child’s teacher for more information.





FUN FACT: According to nobullying.com, one of the main reasons children have attention seeking behavior is that some children get as little as 7 minutes a day of one on one time with their parents! 

Friday, November 4, 2016

November-Positive Communication

NOVEMBER – POSITIVE COMMUNICATION

Communication is what we say and how we say it. Positive communication between you and your child helps to create happy and trusting relationships and develop confidence and a good self-image. Building these types of relationships will also help with limiting unwanted behaviors because your child will be more trusting and want to please you. Practicing positive communication now will have lifelong effects! Check out these tips and suggestions:



DID YOU KNOW? At the Don Earl Early Childhood Center, we strive to be positive. For every one directive we give, we try to notice and say four positive comments. We have 4:1 posters posted all around the center!

FUN FACT: Studies show that children do best when they have at least three loving and supportive adult influences in their lives.



Friday, October 7, 2016

October-Language

Speech and Language development begins at birth. Language will develop as children learn new uses, increase their vocabulary, and speak and understand more complex sentences. We continue to learn and revise our language over our lifetime, but the first 3-5 years of life are the most important. It is during these years that the brain’s organization, development, and life functioning is shaped.   The preschool years especially need to be filled with experiences that are rich with sounds and listening to the language of others. The following resources will give you some ideas of what to expect and how to promote speech and language growth:




DID YOU KNOW?: Infant educational television does not promote intellectual development, because infants respond to things that respond to them. Even the most advanced DVD does not respond to the specific cues of an infant. Playing with a baby is far more valuable than even the most expensive system of videos.

FUN FACT: Babies whose parents talk to them frequently know 300 more words by age 2 than babies whose parents rarely speak to them.

Friday, September 2, 2016

September-Age Appropriate Expectations

Age Appropriate Expectations

Beginning at birth, children progress through their development changing and growing physically, socially, and cognitively. This process involves learning skills such as sitting, crawling, walking, talking, and learning concepts like colors and shapes. It also involves skills such as following directions, being able to attend to an activity, and taking turns. Many of these skills are referred to as developmental milestones and help us to predict when most children will attain them. It is important to remember that although children tend to follow a fairly predictable course of development, each child is unique and may gain some skills a little sooner and some skills a little later than peers of the same age. Some children exhibit developmental delays and it is important to adjust the guidelines and expectations based on their current functioning and not the actual age of the child. For example, children who have not attained typical two year old skills are probably NOT ready to potty train, just because they are 2 years old.

The following are good resources for age appropriate expectations. If you have any additional questions or concerns about age appropriate expectations, please contact your child’s teacher.